Edible

Nettle Pasta

April 30, 2020

I had a week off work, so decided to do some wild cooking. The annual leave was booked a few months back when I thought I’d be enjoying spring in the Cotswolds, but lockdown hindered those plans! Not to worry, living in the very green Sheffield means there are plenty of places to explore, and I did just that. I follow lots of different foraging accounts on insta and they all have their own style; so, I guess this dish was a mix of ideas from there! I think it is a good idea to experiment with your own recipes, hence, I have noted down the basics on making the nettle pasta and then let your imagination do the rest!

Ingredients

  • 10 nettle tops (you will use the leaves)
  • Olive oil
  • Salt (big pinch of)
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 cups plain flour


Method

  1. De-stem the nettle leaves into a bowl, removing as much stalk as you can.
  2. Either discard of the stems or use them for making something funky (rope etc.)
  3. Steam the nettle leaves on a high heat for around 10 minutes until soft.
  4. Once ready, remove the nettles from the steamer and place them in cold water to cool.
  5. Squeeze excess water out of them and place on chopping board.
  6. Use a sharp knife or scissors to chop the nettle leafs as small as possible.
  7. Place them in a mixing bowl with your eggs, flour, oil and salt.
  8. Kneed them together for as long as it takes to form a dough.
  9. Once you have your dough, place in the fridge and leave to rest for an hour or so.
  10. Once rested, divide the dough into workable sizes and roll a piece out on to a chopping board.
  11. If you’re having trouble with the dough breaking then kneed it for another 5 minutes before using.
  12. Once you have rolled your dough thin enough, use a pizza cutter to make your tagliatelle strings.

To cook – add the pasta to a pan of boiling water with a good splash of olive oil, then leave to boil until it is soft (this took me about 10/15 minutes).


Here is a video I made of my day! Enjoy the cooking x


Disclaimer: Introducing wild food into your cooking is fun, but you need to be 100% sure of your identification and cautious of your own allergies. These pages serve more as a diary of recipes I have tried rather than suggestions.

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